Hi friends!

Today I’m sharing a card I made using the new Trinity Stamps Blooming Bunch Stamp Set and Kuretake Zig Clean Color Real Brush Markers. 

I love using watercolors with floral stamps, so I knew right away that this would be the perfect combination!


Handmade floral card

To get started, I prepped a piece of Strathmore Vellum Bristol Paper with an anti-static tool to make sure my embossing powder would only stick to the stamped areas. I then stamped the sheet with the bouquet from the Blooming Bunch Stamp Set using a Versamark Embossing Ink Pad and covered the stamped image with a generous amount of WOW Embossing Powder in Opaque Vanilla White.

For the second layer, I die cut the scalloped frame die from the Mama Elephant Frilly Window Frame Die Set using a piece of Neenah 110lb white cardstock. I wanted a background to set the bouquet on, but I didn’t want it to take away from the colorful flowers, so I went with the Love You More cling background stamp. I stamped and heat embossed it with the same WOW Embossing Powder in Vanilla White, then glued this piece directly onto the middle of my scalloped frame. I glued the background onto the kraft piece and set the bouquet in the center using foam tape for dimension and stability.


Next (my favorite part!) I hand-colored in the bouquet using Kuretake Zig Clean Color Real Brush Markers. Once I was happy with the coloring, I die cut the bouquet using the coordinating die. For the background layers, I cut a piece of heavyweight kraft cardstock to an A2 (4.25" x 5.5") size base.

Finally, to complete my card, I picked a sentiment from the Simon Says Stamp Beautiful Butterflies Stamp Set. I heat embossed this (again, using the same embossing powder) onto a piece of kraft paper. I did this process twice to give my imprint a little more texture. Once complete, I used foam tape to place it at the base of card along the stems of the bouquet.

Hope you enjoyed this card as much as I enjoyed creating it! Thank you for stopping by!

♡ Dee
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